Godbout – Racicot / LeBeuf – LaHaye

Louis XV de Bourbon Roi de France

Male 1700 - 1774  (74 years)


Personal Information    |    Sources    |    All    |    PDF

  • Name Louis XV de Bourbon Roi de France  [1, 2, 3, 4, 5
    Born 15 Feb 1700  Château de Versailles, Yvelines, Île-de-France, France Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Occupation 1712-1715 
    Dauphin de France 
    Occupation 1712-1715 
    Duc d'Anjou 
    Occupation 1 Sep 1715 
    Roi de France et de Navarre 
    Occupation 25 Oct 1722 
    Sacré et couronné à la cathédrale de Reims 
    Occupation 11 Jan 1726 
    Charles de La Boiche, marquis de Beauharnois, est nommé gouverneur général de la Nouvelle-France (débarque à Québec le 28 août) 
    Military 15 Mar 1744 
    La guerre de Succession d'Autriche est déclarée 
    Occupation 19 Mar 1746 
    Jacques-Pierre de Taffanel, marquis de Jonquière, est nommé gouverneur général de la Nouvelle-France (décédé à Québec le 17 mars 1752) 
    Occupation 18 Oct 1748 
    Signature du traité d'Aix-la-Chapelle 
    Occupation 15 Apr 1752 
    Ange de Menneville, marquis de Du Quesne, est nommé gouverneur général de la Nouvelle-France (débarque à Québec le 1 juillet 1752) 
    Occupation 1 Jan 1755 
    Pierre de Rigaud, de Cavagnal, marquis de Vaudreuil, est nommé gouverneur général de la Nouvelle-France 
    Occupation 23 Jun 1755 
    Le gouverneur de Vaudreuil débarque à Québec (flotte commandée par Emmanuel-Auguste de Cahideuc, comte du Bois de La Motte) 
    Occupation 11 Mar 1756 
    Louis-Joseph, marquis de Montcalm, est nommé maréchal de camp en Nouvelle-France 
    Military 13 Sep 1759 
    Défaite de Montcalm (mortellement blessé et décédé le lendemain à cinq heures du matin) à Québec (bataille des Plaines d'Abraham) 
    Military 8 Sep 1760 
    Capitulation du Canada (Nouvelle-France) signée à Montréal par le gouverneur général Pierre de Rigaud, marquis de Vaudreuil 
    Occupation 3 Nov 1762 
    Une entente de paix préliminaire avec l'Angleterre est conclue à Fontainebleau (Guerre de Sept Ans) 
    Occupation 10 Feb 1763 
    La Nouvelle-France s'éteint et passe à l'histoire lorsque le traité de Paris est signé avec l'Angleterre 
    Died 10 May 1774  Château de Versailles, Yvelines, Île-de-France, France Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Cause: Septicémie aggravée de complications pulmonaires 
    Buried Église de l'abbaye royale Saint-Denis, Île-de-France (Paris), France Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I10005  Godbout
    Last Modified 18 Apr 2017 

    Father Louis de Bourbon,   b. 6 Aug 1682, Château de Versailles, Yvelines, France Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 18 Feb 1712, Château de Marly (Marly-le-Roi), France Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 29 years) 
    Mother Marie Adélaïde de Savoie,   b. 6 Dec 1685, Turin (Cap du Piémont), Royaume de Savoie Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 12 Feb 1712, Château de Versailles, Yvelines, France Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 26 years) 
    Marriage Contract 15 Sep 1696 
    Married 7 Dec 1697  Château de Versailles, Yvelines, Île-de-France, France Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID F5146  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Marie Leszczynska Reine de France,   b. 23 Jun 1703, Trzebnica, Pologne Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 24 Jul 1768, Château de Versailles, Yvelines, Île-de-France, France Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 65 years) 
    Marriage Contract 19 Jul 1725  Paris, Île-de-France (Seine), France Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Marriage Contract 9 Aug 1725  Château de Versailles, Yvelines, Île-de-France, France Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Married 15 Aug 1725  Strasbourg, Alsace, Bas-Rhin, France Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Marriage Info. 5 Sep 1725  Fontainebleau, Seine-et-Marne, Île-de-France, France Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. Louis de Bourbon,   b. 4 Sep 1729, Château de Versailles, Yvelines, France Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 19 Dec 1765, Fontainebleau, Seine-et-Marne, Île-de-France, France Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 36 years)
    Last Modified 18 Apr 2017 
    Family ID F5147  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Sources 
    1. [S628] Dictionnaire de la noblesse, seconde et troisième éditions, François-Alexandre Aubert de La Chenaye-Desbois, (La Veuve Duchesne, libraire, Antoine Boudet, l'auteur, rue Saint-André-des-Arcs, Schlésinger frères, Paris, 1770-1778), Tome 6, pp. 654-655 & Tome 8, p. 597.

    2. [S768] Dictionnaire généalogique, héraldique, historique et chronologique, François-Alexandre Aubert de La Chenaye-Desbois, (Chez Duchesne, Libraire, rue S. Jacques, au-dessous de la Fontaine S. Benoît, au Temple du Goût, 1761), Tome IV, p. xij.

    3. [S576] Histoire généalogique et chronologique de la maison royale de France, Anselme de Sainte-Marie, augustin déchaussé, (Troisième Édition, la Compagnie des Libraires, Paris, 2 août 1726-1733), Volume 1, pp. 181-182.
      Également: Histoire de la fortification, La citadelle et la place de Saint-Jean-Pied-de-Port, de la Renaissance à l'Époque Contemporaine, Gérard Folio, général de division, Centre d'études d'histoire de la Défense, Cahier n° 25, 2005, Tome 2, p. 24. Point de Vue/Hors-Série Histoire, 23 rue de Châteaudun, Paris, 2009: Généalogie, 1 200 ans d'histoire, d'Hugues Capet au comte de Paris, la plus vieille famille d'Europe, p. 7 & Le Classicisme (1589-1774), d'Henri IV à Louis XV, le soleil des Bourbons, par François Billaut, pp. 34-35.

    4. [S766] History of Middlesex County, Massachusetts, Samuel Adams Drake, (Estes and Lauriat, Publishers, 301 Washington Street, Boston, 1880), Volume 1, pp. 219-221.
      In 1739, John Fitch settled in Ashby. Nothing worthy of note occurred till the attack by the Indians, July 5, 1748, on Fitch's Garrison, which was situated on the farm now owned and occupied by Paul Gates, upon the rise of the land near the turn of the road leading from Ashby to Ashburnham, and on the old road from Lunenburg to Northfield and the Connecticut valley. 12 July 1748: 'The humble Remonstrance of the Commissioned Officers and Selectmen of Lunenburg showeth that on the fifth day of this instant July, the enemy beset and destroyed one of the outmost garrisons in the town aforesaid, killed two soldiers and captivated a family consisting of a man, his wife, and five children, and that on the seventh day of the month they discovered themselves in a bold, insulting manner three miles further into the town (as far as Pearl Hill in Fitchburg) than the garrison which they had destroyed, where they chased and shot at one of the inhabitants (Mr. David Goodridge) who narrowly escaped their hands; since which, we have had undoubted signs of their being among us. Several of the garrisons built by order and directions of the General Court are already deserted for want of help; and several more garrisons of equal importance that were built at the cost and expense of particular men are deserted likewise. For three days in four, the last week, the inhabitants were necessarily rallied by alarms and hurried into the woods after the enemy; and this we have just reason to conclude, will be the case, frequently to be called from our business, for almost daily the enemy are heard shooting in the woods above us, and to be thus frequently called from business in such a season must impoverish us, if the enemy should not destroy us; and what we greatly regret is, our enemies having a numerous herd of our cattle to support themselves with, and feast upon, among which they have repeatedly been heard shooting, from which we conclude that there may be great slaughter among our cattle.' From this remonstrance, which is dated the 12th, seven days after the destruction of Fitch's little garrison, it appears that the Indians in some force were lingering in the vicinity, causing much anxiety and distress to the unprotected inhabitants in their scattered homes. Also History of the county of Schenectady, N. Y., from 1662 to 1886, George Rogers Howell and John H. Munsell, W. W. Munsell & CO., Publishers, New York, 1886, pp. 33-34. Beukendaal Massacre, 18 July 1748: A brief letter to Col. William Johnson, written by Albert Van Slyck, July 21, 1748, three days after the affair, is the only semi-official narrative we have by one who was in the fight. The second account, written by Giles F. Yates, Esq., and published in the Schenectady Democrat and Reflector, April 22, 1836, was gathered from tradition then floating about among the aged people of that day. From the accounts it is certain that the presence of the Indians was not suspected until the first shot; that Capt. Daniel Toll was the first victim; that the alarm was given by his negro Ryckert; that a company of Connecticut levies, under Lieut. John Darling, accompanied and followed by squads of the inhabitants (60 men), marched to the scene, and that, after a hot engagement, the Indians retreated, leaving twenty of the whites dead and taking away thirteen prisoners, besides the (four) wounded. Considering the number of whites engaged, their loss was very severe, amounting probably to one-third of their force.

    5. [S644] Dictionnaire général du Canada, Louis Le Jeune, (Université d'Ottawa, Canada; Imprimé en France, Firmin-Didot et Cie., Mesnil, Eure, 1931), Tome 1, pp. 37, 133-134, 197-199, 561-563, 646 & 654-655.
      Dictionnaire général de biographie, histoire, littérature, agriculture, commerce, industrie et des arts, sciences, moeurs, coutumes, institutions politiques et religieuses du Canada. Également: Tome 2, pp. 43-47, 242-242, 291-296 & 764-768. Le lieutenant Paul Marin ravage Sarasteau (Saratoga à 15 lieues du fort Saint-Frédéric) le 29 novembre 1745 avec 400 Franco-Canadiens et 200 Sauvages domiciliés (de retour à Montréal le 19 décembre). Charles Deschamps de Boishébert (neveu de Jean-Baptiste-Nicolas Roch de Ramezay) attaque les Britanniques près du Port-la-Joie de l'Île Saint-Jean avec 500 hommes en 1746 (sur 200 Anglais un seul réussit à se sauver, les autres étant pris ou tués). Départ d'un armement considérable le 22 juin 1746 commandé par Jean-Baptiste-Frédéric de Roy de La Rochefoucauld, duc d'Anville, pour reprendre l'Île-Royale: le 'Northumberland', vaisseau amiral de 64 canons; le 'Trident', de 64 canons, commandant d'Estournelles (Constantin-Louis d'Estourmel); 'l'Ardent', de 64 canons, commandant de Coulombe; le 'Mars', de 64 canons, commandant de Cresnay; 'l'Alcide', de 64 canons, commandant de Noailles; le 'Borée', de 64 canons, commandant Duquesne; le 'Léopard', de 64 canons, commandant La Clue; le 'Tigre', de 14 canons, commandant Le Moyne de Sérigny; le 'Diamant', de 10 canons, commandant de Blénac; le 'Caribou', de 14 canons, commandant de Marquayssac; la 'Renommée', de 30 canons, commandant de Kersaint; la 'Mégère', de 30 canons, commandant de la Jonquière; la 'Lutine', de 24 canons, commandant de Quélen; la 'Palme', de 10 canons, commandant de Tréauden; la 'Perle', de 8 canons, commandant la Jaille. À ces quinze vaisseaux de ligne, le ministre joignit 8 frégates, 4 brûlots, 2 galiotes et environ 50 transports; ces voiliers, armés de plus de 800 canons, étaient montés par 3.150 soldats, non compris les équipages; 7.000 hommes en tout. La flotte sera dispersée désastreusement par une violente tempête au large de l'Acadie le 14 septembre 1746 (2.500 décès). François-Pierre de Rigaud, comte et marquis de Vaudreuil (frère du gouverneur général Pierre, les fils de Philippe et de Louise-Élisabeth de Joybert): Dans l'été de 1746, M. (le gouverneur Charles de La Boiche) de Beauharnois le chargeait d'une importante expédition sur les terres de la Nouvelle-Angleterre. Le détachement, parti de Montréal le 3 août, se rendit au fort Massachusetts, où il y avait 22 hommes de garnison, trois femmes et cinq enfants, lesquels se défendirent durant 26 heures et se rendirent prisonniers de guerre. Le chevalier fut blessé d'un coup de feu au bras droit, et trois de ses Sauvages furent tués; quatre Français et onze Indiens furent blessés. Ce parti fit beaucoup de ravages sur une étendue de 15 lieues, brûlant tout sur son passage : il revint le 26 septembre avec 27 prisonniers. Le 8 juin 1747, nouvelle excursion d'un parti de guerre de 780 hommes; M. de Rigaud ramena encore 41 prisonniers et 28 chevelures. Jacques-Pierre de Taffanel, marquis de Jonquière, est capturé par la flotte des amiraux George Anson et Peter Warren le 14 mai 1747 (débarque à Québec le 15 août 1749). Le 1er mai 1749, M. (François-Pierre) de Rigaud succédait au chevalier (Claude-Michel) Bégon comme gouverneur des Trois-Rivières. En 1754, il eut un congé pour se rendre en France. L'été suivant, il en revenait sur 'l'Alcide' qui fut capturé, ainsi que le 'Lys', par l'escadre de l'amiral (Edward) Boscawen à 25 lieues de Terre-Neuve (8 juin). Fait prisonnier, M de Rigaud fut emmené en Angleterre, d'où il réussit à s'échapper, après quelques mois, et à passer en France. Le 4 mai 1756, il débarquait à Québec : le roi lui avait accordé (9 avril) une indemnité ou gratification de 8.000 livres. Après la prise de Chouagen (Oswégo) le 14 août, M. de Rigaud, à la tête des Canadiens et des Sauvages eut les honneurs de la victoire, parce qu'il leur avait fait passer la rivière à la nage pour tomber à l'improviste sur les ennemis; l'un des drapeaux anglais fut déposé à l'église de Trois-Rivières comme trophée. 21 mars 1756: M. (Louis-Joseph) de Montcalm arrivait à Brest, port de l'embarquement, où l'attendait 1.100 a 1.200 hommes de la Sarre et du Royal-Roussillon: cinq jours après, ces troupes montaient à bord du 'Héros', de 74 canons, de 'l'Illustre' 64 et du 'Léopard' 60. M. de Montcalm était embarqué, ainsi que M. de Bougainville (capitaine réformé), sur la frégate la 'Licorne', commandée par M. de La Rigaudière; M. de Lévis (brigadier), ainsi que M. de La Rochebeaucour (second aide de camp), M. des Combles (ingénieur) et M. de Fontbrune, aide de camp du premier, sur la 'Sauvage', commandée par M. de Tourville; M. de Bourlamaque (colonel), ainsi que MM. Desandrouins (capitaine en second du génie) et Marcel (troisième aide de camp), sur la 'Sirène', commandée par M. de Brugnon. Le départ, faute de vent favorable, ne s'effectua que le 3 avril. Le 5 mai, le vaisseau entrait dans le Saint-Laurent; le 10, il était rendu au Cap-Tourmente, où le général prit terre dans l'espoir d'aller à Québec; mais il ne trouva aucun véhicule; le 12, il se fit descendre à Saint-Joachim, passa la nuit chez M. de Buron, curé de Château-Richer et arriva, le 13, à Québec, quelques heures après la 'Licorne', 'ayant trouvé le pays très beau et bien cultivé' (reçu par Bigot).