Godbout – Racicot / LeBeuf – LaHaye

Elizabeth Hull

Female Abt 1628 - 1706  (~ 78 years)


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  • Name Elizabeth Hull  [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24
    Born Abt 1628  Northleigh, Exeter, Devonshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Female 
    Emigration 20 Mar 1635  From Weymouth (Dorset, England) to America Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Immigration 7 Jun 1635  Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts, New England (aged 7) Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Occupation 7 Jun 1635 
    Landed at Dorchester 
    Residence 8 Jul 1635  Wessaguscus (Weymouth, bounded to the south-east of Boston Harbor), Massachusetts, New England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Residence 1637-1638  Hingham (Nantasket), Massachusetts, New England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Residence 1639-1640  Barnstable (Mattakeese), Massachusetts, New England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Residence 1642  Dover, Cochecho, Strafford, New Hampshire, New England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Occupation 7 Sep 1676 
    Concealed a young Indian boy when Major Richard Waldron underhandedly rounded-up displaced refugees at Dover (end of King Philip's War) 
    Property 2 Apr 1687 
    Named in her husband's will 
    Occupation 28 Jun 1689 
    Narrowly escaped the "Cochecho Massacre" at Dover (8 July new style, Gregorian calendar) 
    Occupation 28 Jun 1689 
    Unmolested because the young Indian she had helped in 1676 was part of the war-party and recognized her 
    Died 30 Nov 1706  Dover, Cochecho, Strafford, New Hampshire, New England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I3635  Godbout
    Last Modified 18 Apr 2017 

    Father Joseph Hull,   b. 25 Apr 1595, Crewkerne, Somerset, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 18 Nov 1665, Isles of Shoals, New Hampshire (10 miles offshore at the mouth of the Piscataqua River) Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 70 years) 
    Mother Unknown Hull Spouse,   b. Abt 1600, Crewkerne, Somerset, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Abt 1632, Crewkerne, Somerset, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 32 years) 
    Married Abt 1618  Crewkerne, Somerset, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID F1824  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family John Heard,   b. 29 Nov 1612, Saint Pancras, Chichester, Sussex, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 17 Jan 1688, Dover, Cochecho, Strafford, New Hampshire, New England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 75 years) 
    Married Abt 1642  Dover, Cochecho, Strafford, New Hampshire, New England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. Benjamin Heard,   b. 20 Feb 1644, York, York Co., Province of Maine, New England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 22 Jan 1710, Salisbury, Essex Co., Massachusetts, New England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 65 years)
     2. William Heard,   b. Abt 1645, Dover, Cochecho, Strafford, New Hampshire, New England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1 Nov 1675, Dover, Cochecho, Strafford, New Hampshire, New England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 30 years)
     3. Katherine Heard,   b. Abt 1647, Dover, Cochecho, Strafford, New Hampshire, New England Find all individuals with events at this location
     4. Mary Heard,   b. 26 Jan 1649, Dover, Cochecho, Strafford, New Hampshire, New England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 7 Dec 1706, Dover, Cochecho, Strafford, New Hampshire, New England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 57 years)
     5. Abigail Heard,   b. 2 Aug 1651, Dover, Cochecho, Strafford, New Hampshire, New England Find all individuals with events at this location
     6. Elizabeth Heard,   b. 15 Sep 1653, Dover, Cochecho, Strafford, New Hampshire, New England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 9 Nov 1705, Dover, Cochecho, Strafford, New Hampshire, New England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 52 years)
     7. Hannah Heard,   b. 22 Nov 1655, Dover, Cochecho, Strafford, New Hampshire, New England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1686, Berwick, York County, Maine, New England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 30 years)
     8. John Heard,   b. 24 Feb 1658, Dover, Cochecho, Strafford, New Hampshire, New England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Aft 1697  (Age 39 years)
     9. Joseph Heard,   b. 4 Jan 1660, Dover, Cochecho, Strafford, New Hampshire, New England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1661, Dover, Cochecho, Strafford, New Hampshire, New England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 0 years)
     10. Samuel Heard,   b. 4 Aug 1663, Dover, Cochecho, Strafford, New Hampshire, New England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 10 Feb 1697, Dover, Cochecho, Strafford, New Hampshire, New England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 33 years)
     11. Dorcas Heard,   b. Abt 1665, Dover, Cochecho, Strafford, New Hampshire, New England Find all individuals with events at this location
     12. Tristram Heard,   b. 4 Mar 1667, Dover, Cochecho, Strafford, New Hampshire, New England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1734, Dover, Cochecho, Strafford, New Hampshire, New England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 66 years)
     13. Nathaniel Heard,   b. 20 Sep 1668, Dover, Cochecho, Strafford, New Hampshire, New England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 3 Apr 1700, Dover, Cochecho, Strafford, New Hampshire, New England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 31 years)
    Last Modified 18 Apr 2017 
    Family ID F1822  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Sources 
    1. [S180] The Great Migration Begins: Immigrants to New England 1620-1633, Robert Charles Anderson, (New England Historic Genealogical Society, Boston, 1995, 2000), 1634-1635, Vol. III, G-H, p. 455.

    2. [S658] The original lists of persons of quality; who went from Great Britain to the American Plantations, 1600-1700, John Camden Hotten, (Chatto and Windus, London, England, 1874, reprinted: Empire State Book Co., New York), 283.

    3. [S196] NEHGR: New England Historical and Genealogical Register, (New England Historical and Genealogical Society, Boston, Massachusetts), Vol. 5 (1851), p. 187, Vol. 25 (1871), p. 13 & Vol. 33 (1879), p. 96.
      (Shipping list containing the names, occupations and ages of 106 passengers from the Hull colony accompanied by the following explanatory note): 'London, Sept. 1870. My Dear Mr. (William S.) Appleton, Amongst a bundle of miscellaneous manuscripts just turned up in the Public Record Office, I find with other documents relating to New England, the following list of passengers, which I have the pleasure of sending to you for publication in the Register. I remain yours very truly, H. G. Somerby' (Bound for New England). Dr. Belknap describes the manner in which Elder (William) Wentworth saved Heard's garrison at the great Indian massacre, 27th June, 1689, as follows: Heard's Garrison was saved by the barking of a dog just as the Indians were entering. Elder Wentworth, who was awakened by the noise, pushed them out; and falling on his back, set his feet against the gate and held it till he had alarmed the people; two balls were fired through it, but both missed him (Vol. 17, 1863, p. 69). Vol. 42 (1888), pp. 185-197 & 285-288: Capture of 200 Indians refugees at Dover on 7 September 1676 by Major Richard Waldron and then sent to Boston. Vol. 42 (1888), pp. 291-298: Cochecho Massacre.

    4. [S744] The History of Concord with a History of the Ancient Penacooks, Nathaniel Bouton, (Benning W. Sanborn, McFarland & Jenks, Printers, Concord, NH, 1856), 17-48.

    5. [S96] The History of the State of Maine; from its first discovery, A. D. 1602, to the separation, A. D. 1820, William D. Williamson, (Glazier, Masters & Smith, Hallowell, 1832), Volume 1, pp. 515-547.
      The first open hostilities between the eastern (Anglo) inhabitants and the natives, were commenced in the celebrated king Philip's war. It broke out in the colony of Plymouth, June 24, 1675. The prominent actors in this year's war (Maine/Acadia region) were the Sokokis, Anasagunticooks and a part of the Canibas tribe. Madockawando's emissary Mugg (Mog) signed a peace treaty in Boston on 6 November 1676.

    6. [S110] The Book of The Indians of North America, Samuel Gardner Drake, (Josiah Drake, Antiquarian Bookstore, Boston, 1833), Book III, Chapter II, pp. 13-40 & Chapter VIII, pp. 107-108.
      Also: History of Hadley, including the early history of Hatfield, South Hadley, Amherst and Granby, Massachusetts, Sylvester Judd, with Family Genealogies by Lucius Manlius Boltwood, Metcalf & Company, Northampton, 1863, pp. 159-182 (King Philip’s War).

    7. [S202] Piscataqua Pioneers, 1623-1775: Register of Members & Ancestors, John Scales, (Higginson Book Company, Press of Charles F. Whitehouse, Dover, N.H., May 1919), 96-97 & 105.
      Also: Proceedings of the Rhode Island Historical Society, Providence, 1878, p. 121 (King Philip's quote to John Borden: 'I am determined not to live until I have no country.'). Passaconaway in the White Mountains, Charles Edward Beals, Jr. (published by Richard G. Badger, Boston, 1916), Chapter III: Wonalancet, the 'pleasant-breathing' & Chapter IV: How Kankamagus crossed out the account.

    8. [S527] The Border wars of New England, commonly called King William's and Queen Anne's wars, Samuel Adams Drake, (Charles Scribner's Sons, New York, 1910), 10-22.
      1688: Sir Edward Andros sailed to various points of the Maine coast, as far as St. Castin's trading-post, at Penobscot. Before leaving, however, he plundered St. Castin's house, respecting only the altar and vessels of the Catholic mission. The baseness of the act, so like to that of some roving buccaneer, aroused the indignation of St. Castin's tribesmen, the Penobscots, over whom he had unlimited control, and they were now ready to dig up the hatchet whenever he should give the signal. Egeremet (chief sagamore at Teconnet) angrily told Henry Smith of New Dartmouth (Newcastle) that St. Castin had promised the Indians all the powder and ball they might want to fight the English with. At the same time a Jesuit missionary arrived from Canada, bringing a present of powder and guns, and furthermore announcing that two hundred Frenchman would shortly follow him.

    9. [S208] Journal of the Rev. John Pike. A memorandum of personal occurrences, Otis Grant Hammond, Collections of the New Hampshire Historical Society, (Jacob B. Moore, Concord, New Hampshire, 1832), Volume III, p. 43.
      28 June 1689: The Eastern Indians, joining with those of Penacook, through the instigation of Hogkins, a sagamore, suddenly seized on Cochecho, about the break of day, when all things were silent and secure. Killed 23 persons, principal of whom were Major Waldron, Mr. Leigh, [Abraham Lee, see Belknap, i. 126,] Mr. Evans, Richard Otis, Joseph Dug, Joseph Duncan, Daniel Lunt, Joseph Sanders, Stephen Otis, Jos. Buss, Wm. Buss, Wm. Arin, Wm. Horn, and old widow Hanson. Carried captive 29, whereof the chief were Joseph Chase, Mrs. Leigh, [wife of Abraham, and daughter of Maj. Waldron,] Tobias Hanson's wife, Otis's wife, Sarah Gerrish, &c. August following, James Huggins of Oyster River was killed, his garrison taken, and 18 killed and carried away.

    10. [S249] The Gazetteer of the State of New Hampshire, Eliphalet Merrill and Phinehas Merrill, Esq., (C. Norris & Co., Exeter, NH, 1817), Part Two: Dover, pp. 111-117.

    11. [S659] History of the town of Durham, New Hampshire (Oyster River Plantation) with genealogical notes, Everett S. Stackpole, Col. Lucien Thompson and Winthrop Smith Meserve, (Published by the vote of the town, Durham, New Hampshire, 1913), Volume 2, pp. 222 & 224.

    12. [S31] True Stories of New England Captives Carried to Canada during the Old French and Indian Wars, Charlotte Alice Baker, (Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1897), 15-23.

    13. [S32] New England Captives Carried to Canada between 1677 and 1760 during the French and Indian Wars, Emma Lewis Coleman, (The Southworth Press, Portland, Maine, 1925), Volume 1, pp. 137-165.

    14. [S101] The History of New Hampshire, edited by John Farmer, Jeremy Belknap, (S. C. Stevens and Ela & Wadleigh, Dover, N.H., 8 February 1831; George Wadleigh, 1862), 75-76 & 125-129.

    15. [S25] The Genealogical Dictionary of Maine and New Hampshire, Sybil Noyes, Charles Thornton Libby and Walter Goodwin Davis, (Southworth-Anthoensen Press, 1928-1939, Genealogical Publishing Co., Baltimore, 1972), 322, 358.

    16. [S205] The Wentworth Genealogy: England and America, John Wentworth, LL. D., (Little, Brown, and Company, Boston, 1878), Volume 1, p. 160.

    17. [S182] A Genealogical Dictionary of the First Settlers of New England, James Savage, compiled by O.P. Dexter, (Boston: 1860-1862, reprinted by Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1990), Vol. 2, p. 397.

    18. [S183] History of Weymouth, Massachusetts, George Walter Chamberlain, (Wright & Potter Company, 1923, Genealogical Publishing Co., Baltimore, MD, 1984), Volume 1, pp. 72-73.

    19. [S221] The Pioneers of Maine and New Hampshire, Charles Henry Pope, (C.H. Pope, Boston, Massachusetts, 1908), 91.

    20. [S220] Old Kittery and Her Families, Everett S. Stackpole, (Press of Lewiston Journal, Lewiston, Maine, 1903), 511.

    21. [S759] Landmarks in Ancient Dover, New Hampshire, Complete Edition, Mary P. Thompson, (Durham, N. H., 26 May 1892, printed by the Republican Press Association, Concord, N. H.), 44.

    22. [S669] The Northern Colonial Frontier, 1607-1763, Douglas Edward Leach, (Holt Reinhart & Winston, New York, 1966), 110.
      The Penacooks attacked Dover (on 28 June 1689) killing some two dozen people and taking 29 others captive (in retaliation for the 1688 attack by Sir Edmund Andros on Jean-Vincent d'Abbadie de Saint-Castin's Bagaduce River dwelling at Pentagouët).

    23. [S606] Histoire du Canada, huitième édition, revue et augmentée par Hector Garneau, François-Xavier Garneau, (Éditions de l'Arbre, Montréal, 1944), Tome III, Livre 5, chap. 2, p. 191.

    24. [S93] Série d'articles, Père Clarence-J. d'Entremont, (Yarmouth Vanguard, Yarmouth, Nouvelle-Écosse, 3 janvier 1989 - 27 novembre 1990), 18 avril 1989.